Posts

Showing posts from November, 2019

Gardening to Uplift, Heal and Keep Alert

Image
Are you feeling a little down? depressed? Well here is a way to fix that -  go out and plant something...
Studies have found that an hour of gardening a day reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke and increases bone density more efficiently than aerobics or swimming!

In fact, even looking at nature can result in a drop in blood pressure within five minutes and lower our stress hormones.


One 16-year study in Australia revealed that those who did daily gardening even cut their risk of getting dementia in later life.

(Gardening boosts endorphins, the body’s good-mood chemicals. Personally, my theory is that we need the sunlight on our pineal gland and this can delay dementia, but I have no proof, its just a 'knowing')


Here is a lovely story from Timesonline United Kingdom, dated March 27, 2010

"...Jane Robertson was earning a small fortune in the pressured world of derivatives markets when she had a breakdown at the age of 27.

A spell in a psychiatric hospital followed, then ma…

Ten Things I Have Learned by Milton Glaser- a Classic!

Image
This has nothing to do with garden design and everything to do with garden design. (said the Cheshire Cat)

It is one of my favorite 'how to live well' articles. I agree with everything he says!

Milton Glaser is a giant in the graphic design art world. And now, after reading this,  I know he is a very wise man. I must share. 

His designs include the I ♥ NY logo, the psychedelic Bob Dylan poster, the Brooklyn Brewery logo. He founded New York Magazine with Clay Felker in 1968. And he went to my high school, High School of Music and Art. The artwork shown here was done by Milton Glaser.

Go to the Milton Glaser website for more essays and insights . 





Ten Things I Have Learned by Milton Glaser
Part of AIGA Talk in London     November 22, 2001 1
YOU CAN ONLY WORK FOR PEOPLE THAT YOU LIKE.
This is a curious rule and it took me a long time to learn because in fact at the beginning of my practice I felt the opposite. Professionalism required that you didn’t particularly like the people that y…